Skip to main content
OUR SAFEGUARD & WELLNESS PLAN Learn More Close Button
Need time to set up details?
We are happy to send you a reminder while you confirm your booking details.
By submitting this form, you consent to share your personal information with us to service your request and for communication purposes. We do not sell your data to third parties. If you are below 16 years of age, you are required to obtain prior permission from your legal guardian(s). If you wish to access or erase your personal information, you can do so by submitting your details Click to erase your personal information
Close
05Jun
Mountain Man
7:30 PM - 11:59 PM National Sawdust
Date: June 05, 2019 to June 05, 2019
Where: National Sawdust, 80 North 6th Street, New York, New York, United States
Phone: N/A
Event Type: Concerts & Music
Ticket Price: N/A
Doors at 6:30PM Mountain Man did not intend to disappear for the better part of a decade, or to take eight years to release its second album, Magic Ship. But for a trio of devoted friends for whom music has always seemed so effortless and graceful, that’s simply how life went. The wondrous Magic Ship—a magnetic fourteen-song reflection on the joys, follies, and oddities of existence—was well worth the wait. In 2009, when she was a student at a small liberal arts college in New England, Amelia Meath heard a gorgeous sound coming from the living room of her dormitory. She raced downstairs to find Molly Erin Sarlé singing “Dog Song,” a tender tune about lust, longing, and responsibility. Meath demanded that Sarlé, nearly a stranger, teach her the tune, which she, in turn, taught to a friend, Alexandra Sauser-Monnig. The next time the pair saw Sarlé, they sang “Dog Song” to, and then with, her. And so, Mountain Man was born. The three weren’t quite yet friends when they performed, recorded, and even toured for the first time, but they each felt the chemistry within their combined voices, a sense of artistic kismet and kinship that some spend lifetimes seeking. Acclaim came quickly, with their debut—2010’s Made the Harbor, humbly recorded on rickety equipment in an abandoned factory—earning praise from the New York Times and the Guardian and prompting big tours. But before they could return to the studio, post-collegiate life intervened: Meath moved to Durham, North Carolina and eventually started Sylvan Esso. Sarlé headed for a Zen center along the California coast. Sauser-Monnig returned to Minnesota, then decamped to a farm in the North Carolina mountains. They kept in touch with near-weekly conference calls, growing as friends while taking a break from making music together. When Sarlé was ready to leave California, though, Meath and Sauser-Monnig implored her to return east, saying they would even fly to her and drive with her across the country, so long as she sett
Digital Presence Powered by Milestone Inc.
Back to top